About

About Temecula

Temecula is a city in southwestern Riverside County, California, United States. The city is a tourist and resort destination, with the Temecula Valley Wine Country, Old Town Temecula, the Temecula Valley Polo Club, the Temecula Valley Balloon & Wine Festival, the Temecula Valley International Film Festival, championship golf courses, and resort accommodations for tourists which contribute to the city’s economic profile.[8][9][10][11] It is part of the Greater Los Angeles area.

The city of Temecula, forming the southwestern anchor of the Inland Empire region, is approximately 58 miles (93 km) north of downtown San Diego and 85 miles (137 km) southeast of downtown Los Angeles. Temecula is bordered by the city of Murrieta to the north and the Pechanga Indian Reservation and San Diego County to the south. Temecula had a population of 100,097 during the 2010 census[12] and an estimated population of 114,761 as of July 1, 2019.[13] It was incorporated on December 1, 1989.

 

Temecula History

Pre-1800

The area was inhabited by the Temecula Indians for hundreds of years before their contact with the Spanish missionaries (the people are now generally known as the Luiseños, after the nearby Mission San Luis Rey de Francia).[14] The Pechanga Band of Luiseño believe their ancestors have lived in the Temecula area for more than 10,000 years, though ethnologists think they arrived at a more recent date. In Pechanga history, life on Earth began in the Temecula Valley. They call it “Exva Temeeku”, the place of the union of Sky-father, and Earth-mother (“Tuukumit’pi Tamaayowit”). The Temecula Indians (“Temeekuyam”) lived at “Temeekunga”, or “the place of the sun”.[15] Other popular interpretations of the name, Temecula, include “The sun that shines through the mist”[16] or “Where the sun breaks through the mist”.[17]

The first recorded Spanish visit occurred in October 1797, with a Franciscan padre, Father Juan Norberto de Santiago, and Captain Pedro Lisalde.[17][18] Father Santiago kept a journal in which he noted seeing “Temecula … an Indian village”.[19] The trip included Lake Elsinore area and the Temecula Valley.

1800–1900

In 1798, Spanish Missionaries established the Mission of San Luis Rey de Francia and designated the Indians living in the region as “Sanluiseños”, shortened to “Luiseños”.[20] In the 1820s, the Mission San Antonio de Pala was built.

The Mexican land grants made in the Temecula area were Rancho Temecula, granted to Felix Valdez, and to the east Rancho Pauba, granted to Vicente Moraga in 1844. Rancho Little Temeculawas made in 1845 to Luiseño Pablo Apis, one of the few former mission converts to be given a land grant. It was fertile well watered land at the southern end of the valley, which included the village of Temecula.[21][22][23][24] A fourth grant, known as Rancho Santa Rosa was made to Juan Moreno in 1846, and was in the hills to the west of Temecula.

As American settlers moved into the area after the war, conflict with the native tribes increased. A treaty was signed in the Magee Store in Temecula in 1852, but was never ratified by the United States Senate.[25] In addition, the Luiseños challenged the Mexican land grant claims, as under Mexican law, the land was held in trust to be distributed to the local Indian tribes after becoming subjects.[26][27] They challenged the Apis claim to the Little Temecula Rancho by taking the case to the 1851 California Land Commission. On November 15, 1853, the commission rejected the Luiseño claim; an appeal in 1856 to the district court was found to be in favor of the heirs of Pablo Apis (he had died in late 1853 or early 1854). The Luiseño of Temecula village remained on the south side of Temecula Creek when the Apis grant was acquired by Louis Wolf in 1872; they were evicted in 1875.[28]

A stagecoach line started a local route from Warner Ranch to Colton in 1857 that passed through the Temecula Valley. Within a year, the Butterfield Overland Mail stagecoach line, with a route between St. Louis, Missouri, and San Francisco, stopped at Temecula’s Magee Store.[29] On April 22, 1859, the first inland Southern California post office was established in Temecula in the Magee Store. This was the second post office in the state, the first being located in San Francisco. The Temecula post office was moved in the ensuing years; its present locations are the seventh and eighth sites occupied. The American Civil War put an end to the Butterfield Overland Stage Service, but stage service continued on the route under other stage companies until the railroad reached Fort Yuma in 1877.[30]

In 1862, Louis Wolf, a Temecula merchant and postmaster, married Ramona Place, who was mixed-race and half Indian. Author Helen Hunt Jackson spent time with Louis and Ramona Wolf in 1882 and again in 1883. Wolf’s store became an inspiration for Jackson’s fictional “Hartsel’s store” in her 1884 novel, Ramona.[31]

In 1882, the United States government established the Pechanga Indian Reservation of approximately 4,000 acres (16 km2) some 6 miles (9.7 km) from downtown Temecula. Also in 1882, the California Southern Railroad, a subsidiary of the Santa Fe Railroad completed construction of the section from National City to Temecula. In 1883, the line was extended to San Bernardino. In the late 1880s, a series of floods washed out the tracks and the section of the railroad through the canyon was finally abandoned. The old Temecula station was used as a barn and later demolished.

In the 1890s, with the operation of granite stone quarries, Temecula granite was shaped into fence and hitching posts, curb stones, courthouse steps, and building blocks. At the turn of the 20th century, Temecula became an important shipping point for grain and cattle.

1900–1989

Temecula, 1909.

In 1904 Walter L. Vail, who had come to the United States with his parents from Nova Scotia, migrated to California. Along with various partners, he began buying land in Southern California. Vail bought ranchland in the Temecula Valley, buying 38,000 acres (154 km2) of Rancho Temecula and Rancho Pauba, along with the northern half of Rancho Little Temecula. Vail was killed by a street car in Los Angeles in 1906; his son, Mahlon Vail, took over the family ranch. In 1914, financed by Mahlon Vail and local ranchers, the First National Bank of Temecula opened on Front Street. In 1915, the first paved, two-lane county road was built through Temecula.

By 1947, the Vail Ranch contained over 87,500 acres (354 km2). In 1948, the Vail family built a dam to catch the Temecula Creek water and created Vail Lake. Through the mid-1960s, the economy of the Temecula Valley centered around the Vail Ranch; the cattle business and agriculture were the stimuli for most business ventures. In 1964, the Vail Ranch was sold to the Kaiser Aetna partnership. A later purchase by the group brought the total area to 97,500 acres (395 km2), and the area became known as Rancho California. The I-15 corridor between the Greater Los Angeles area and San Diego was completed in the early 1980s, and the subdivision land boom began.

1990–present

The 1990s brought rapid growth to the Temecula Valley. Many families began moving to the area from San Diego, Los Angeles, and Orange County, drawn by the affordable housing prices and the popular wine country. On October 27, 1999, the Promenade Mall opened in Temecula.[32] In 2005, Temecula annexed the master-planned community of Redhawk, bringing the population to 90,000. After a period of rapid population growth and home construction, the 2007 subprime mortgage financial crisis and the resultant United States housing market correction caused a sharp rise in home foreclosures in the Temecula-Murrieta region.

Local Temecula small businesses… MEET local Temecula consumers!

This website serves two different groups in Temecula.

At it’s core, we’ve built this directory to help residents of and visitors to Temecula find the Best Businesses in the city. We’ve focused on businesses who are based here in the local community and offer superior quality and service to their customers. Whether you’re looking for a new favorite coffee shop, or need some remodeling done in your house, we’ve attempted to include the best the city has to offer. If you know of a quality business who’s not here, please let us know and we’ll get in touch.

On the other hand, if you own or manage a local business here in the Temecula Valley area, we invite you to add your business information here. You can choose from a simple free listing, or upgrade to one of our Standard or Premium listings to attract even more new customers. It’s easy to do, and will ensure visitors to this website can find out what you offer. Click here to add your listing.

Part of this symbiotic relationship is the ability of our Premium businesses to run promotional campaigns on our Facebook page at no charge to the business. This gives the consumers a way to try out businesses they’re not familiar with yet, while giving the business a way to reach new customers in a new and exciting way. For more information about this program, send us an email to get more details.

Who runs Local Temecula?

A pair of Temecula passionate long time residents, Keith and Frida Motte help local businesses grow and improve their marketing ROI through their local marketing agency, Marketing Meets Technology. Their passion is to facilitate matching consumers with the businesses that can best serve their needs and to help local businesses get their products and services in front of the people they can help most. Keith originally started Temecula Vally Online back in 2002 – 2008 as a side effort but put the site on hold until now.

 

Temecula References

  1. “California Cities by Incorporation Date”. California Association of Local Agency Formation Commissions. Archived from the original (Word) on November 3, 2014. Retrieved August 25, 2014.

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